Sunday, February 27, 2011

Sexo durante el embarazo - Sex during pregnancy - Pregnancy fetishism - Fetichismo y embarazadas




Pregnancy fetishism

Pregnancy fetishism (also known as maiesiophilia or maieusophoria) is a term used to describe the contexts in which pregnancy is seen by individuals and cultures as an erotic phenomenon. It may involve sexual attraction to women who are pregnant or appear pregnant, attraction to lactation, or attraction to particular stages of pregnancy such as impregnation or childbirth.

There are no particular or preferred elements within maiesiophilia that are common to all maiesiophiliacs. Some may pursue fantasies that are concerned with the circumstances in which a subject may give birth, or to the conditions to which the pregnant subject may find themselves acting upon, such as approaches to mobility, sleeping, and dressing. Particular areas and processes of the body that change during pregnancy may also become the focus of psychological investment, but nudity or sexual activity is not always essential, and in some cases actual pregnancy is not necessary to invoke arousal. In these cases, the appearance of an enlarged abdomen caused by obesity or overeating may be sufficient, or simply the suggestion of a protruding navel.

Pregnancy Fetish: When Men Find You Sexier Pregnant
At no point during my pregnancy did I feel sexy.
Like an elephant minus the trunk and the extra set of legs, yes.

Like a MILF? Oh hell no people.

But every time you start feeling like a giant wrapped around a bowling ball, remember the pregnancy fetishists.
You know, the guys who think you're one swelling mound of sexiness only when you have, um, a swelling mound in front of you.

Where does one find one of these men?

Surprisingly, everywhere. I worked with a guy who was obsessed with the Dixie Chicks' Natalie Maines during the nine months when she carried son Jackson.
Otherwise, he had no use for her.
And the Internet abounds with guys looking for pictures of preggos nekkid (link is SFW) and clothed. There are guys who like to dress up like a pregnant woman and guys who just want to see a big ol' belly to get off.
As a once-pregnant woman, I can't say I get it. I remember cankles. And stretchmarks. And puking.

And forget what the orgasmic birth folks tell you -- there's nothing sexy about poop and blood on the delivery table.

Not to mention the big one ... another man mostly likely got her pregnant. Which means you're fetishizing the product of another couple's unions.
Although, come to think of it, that's what porn is all about.

Any way you look at it ladies, it's always nice to know someone finds us dead sexy even when we feel like dead weight.

Do you feel sexy?


http://thestir.cafemom.com/pregnancy/108637/pregnancy_fetish_when_men_find


Pregnancy & Sex - For Mom


PARENTS.TV hits the streets to ask women and their partners what concerns they have about sex during pregnancy. Our specialist answers all the questions you dared to ask! Working with Parents Magazine, American Baby, Family Circle and www.parents.com. Check us out at www.parents.tv.






Questions About Sex in Pregnancy

Sex in pregnancy can be a touchy subject between couples. The rule is to follow your desires and really open the lines of communication. Over the course of the years, I've been asked many personal questions about sex during pregnancy, here are some of the questions with answers.

Q. Now that I'm pregnant can I still have sex, and if so, for how long into my pregnancy?

A. Sex in pregnancy is wonderful! You can continue to have sex as far into pregnancy, right up until birth, as you and your partner are comfortable. This includes orgasms. There are a few reasons why you shouldn't have sex during certain periods during pregnancy. These include:

* Bleeding
* Preterm Labor
* Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) (you or your partner)

Be sure to talk to your practitioner about specifics for you. When your practitioner says, "No sex." Find out what they mean, do them mean no orgasms? Do they mean no intercourse? If so, for how long? For example, if a woman has a slight bit of bleeding in the first trimester, it's common to be told to avoid intercourse and orgasm for the period of one week from the last episode of bleeding.

Q. Now that my belly is growing we're having a harder time having sex. Any suggestions?

A. Be creative! While many people tend to prefer the missionary position for sex during pregnancy, it becomes a very difficult maneuver to perform as the abdomen gets larger. Try some of these pregnant sex positions:

* Woman on top. This allows you to control the depth of penetration, and the majority of the movement. You can go as fast or as slow as you'd like, while controlling the depth of the penis. This position works really well throughout pregnancy and at the very end of pregnancy.

* Spooning. This position gets it's name from the way spoons fit together in the silver ware drawer. Usually it's best if the man is behind allowing his penis to go between your thighs and enter you from behind. This creates no pressure on the abdomen, and allows for a shallow penetration. Many women find this a very relaxing position for sex during pregnancy, and it can be used throughout.

* Hands & Knees. This is a very good position for pregnant women again because of the lack of direct pressure on the abdomen, although as your get larger your belly may actually rest on the bed. Some women find this difficult at the very end of pregnancy, depending on how high they are able to hold their belly off the bed and still allow for penetration.

* Side lying. This can be kind of tricky, but it can be done! Lay on your side with your partner facing you, try pulling one leg up to allow room for your partner. This may get tiring after awhile, and may not be easy for the last part of pregnancy.

All of the above mentioned positions also allow for manual stimulation of the clitoris either by yourself or your partner. This can greatly increase your chances of becoming multi-orgasmic, not to mention it's a lot of fun. They also prevent the mother from laying on her back, which is not recommended after the fourth month of pregnancy (16 weeks gestation).

When you're trying to think of a good position, try it, if it doesn't work stop. Creativity will be a lot of fun during pregnancy, and it will probably carry over into your postpartum sex life as well, when creativity becomes important in a different way.

Q. One word, orgasms.

A. Many answers to that one! Orgasms can be much different during pregnancy. Some woman will finally become orgasmic during pregnancy due to the increased fluids in the area making the clitoris and vagina more sensitive. Other women will become multi-orgasmic for the first time.

In general, orgasms are very good for you and baby! When you have an orgasm the baby is unaware of what you are doing, but does experience the euphoric hormone rush that you will experience. There will also be minor contractions of the uterus, as there have always been, but now that the uterus is bigger you can feel them more. This is not preterm labor, unless you have this cramping sensation or contractions for more than one hour.

The big problem with orgasms during pregnancy is that, particularly at the end, you many not get quite the sense of relief that a normal orgasm would provide. I've personally walked away from sex feeling more sexually frustrated than before, despite multiple orgasms. Although, it's still worth it!

Q. Can I masturbate? Will it hurt the baby?

A. Masturbation is a great release of sexual energy. I highly encourage this for women. It's also great to have a session of mutual masturbation if you're not interested in penetration. Masturbation is also a good thing to think of if only one person in the relationship is interested in sex at that particular moment. It allows your to be sexual without having to have sex for whatever reason, and yet your partner (or you) can enjoy a release of sexual tension.

Q. I've heard that oral sex is dangerous. Is that true?

A. Oral sex is not dangerous for you while pregnant, with one exception, don't blow air into the vagina. You'll read this a lot of places, but I personally don't know anyone who blows air during cunnilingus, maybe I'm missing out!

Oral sex can be very pleasurable during pregnancy, particularly if you are fearful or simply do not wish to engage in intercourse. It's a great way to try and express your sexuality without sex. There is an increased discharge during pregnancy, this is not harmful to either of you. If either of you are bothered by this you can simply wash yourself prior to engaging in these activities.

Q. Can I have anal sex while pregnant?

A. That's a tough one. Not many people have studied this, and in general I would say that if you've engaged in this prior to becoming pregnant there should be no difficulties, but listen to your body. If it hurts stop. It may also be more difficult at the end of pregnancy as the baby's head engages into the pelvis. We often forget that the only thing that separates the vagina and the rectum is a piece of skin. This may make anal sex more painful at the end of pregnancy.

Q. Can I use a vibrator while pregnant?

A. Anyone want to do a thesis on this one? Seriously, I've been asked this question a number of times, and there isn't a clear cut answer out there. So I'm going to rely on the end result: orgasms.

Orgasms are safe during pregnancy, with a few minor exceptions. Watch for continual contractions of the uterus, and other than that you should be fine. Of course, it would also be good if you could ask your practitioner about this topic as well. They will have more knowledge of your personal medical history. If they say no get specifics on why not, to ensure that it's not personal bias.


http://pregnancy.about.com/cs/sexuality/a/pregsex_2.htm





Sex during pregnancy: What's OK, what's not
Has pregnancy spiked your interest in sex? Or is sex the last thing on your mind? Either way, here's what you need to know about sex during pregnancy.
By Mayo Clinic staff

If you want to get pregnant, you have sex. No surprises there. But what about sex while you're pregnant? The answers aren't always as clear. Here's what you need to know about sex during pregnancy.
Is it OK to have sex during pregnancy?

As long as your pregnancy is proceeding normally, you can have sex as often as you like — but you may not always want to. At first, hormonal fluctuations, fatigue and nausea may sap your sexual desire. During the second trimester, increased blood flow to your sexual organs and breasts may rekindle your desire for sex. But by the third trimester, weight gain, back pain and other symptoms may once again dampen your enthusiasm for sex.
Can sex during pregnancy cause a miscarriage?

Many couples worry that sex during pregnancy will cause a miscarriage, especially in the first trimester. But sex isn't a concern. Early miscarriages are usually related to chromosomal abnormalities or other problems in the developing baby — not to anything you do or don't do.
Does sex during pregnancy harm the baby?

Your developing baby is protected by the amniotic fluid in your uterus, as well as the mucous plug that blocks the cervix throughout most of your pregnancy. Sexual activity won't affect your baby.
What are the best sexual positions during pregnancy?

As long as you're comfortable, most sexual positions are OK during pregnancy. As your pregnancy progresses, experiment to find what works best. Rather than lying on your back, you might want to lie next to your partner sideways or position yourself on top of your partner or in front of your partner. Let your creativity take over, as long as you keep mutual pleasure and comfort in mind.
What about oral and anal sex?

Oral sex is safe during pregnancy. There's a caveat, however. If you receive oral sex, make sure your partner doesn't blow air into your vagina. Rarely, a burst of air may block a blood vessel (air embolism) — which could be a life-threatening condition for you and the baby.

Generally, anal sex isn't recommended during pregnancy. Anal sex may be uncomfortable if you have pregnancy-related hemorrhoids. More concerning, anal sex may allow infection-causing bacteria to spread from the rectum to the vagina.

Are condoms necessary?

Exposure to sexually transmitted infections during pregnancy increases the risk of infections that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Use a condom if your partner has a sexually transmitted infection, you're not in a mutually monogamous relationship or you choose to have sex with a new partner during pregnancy.
Can orgasms trigger premature labor?

Orgasms can cause uterine contractions, but these contractions are different from the contractions you'll feel during labor. If you have a normal pregnancy, orgasms — with or without intercourse — don't seem to increase the risk of premature labor or premature birth. Likewise, sex isn't likely to trigger labor even as your due date approaches.
Are there times when sex should be avoided?

Although most women can safely have sex throughout pregnancy, sometimes it's best to be cautious. Your health care provider may recommend avoiding sex if:

* You're at risk of preterm labor
* You have unexplained vaginal bleeding
* You're leaking amniotic fluid
* Your cervix begins to open prematurely (cervical incompetence)
* Your placenta partly or completely covers your cervical opening (placenta previa)

What if I don't want to have sex?

That's OK. There's more to a sexual relationship than intercourse. Share your needs and concerns with your partner in an open and loving way. If sex is difficult, unappealing or off-limits, try cuddling, kissing or massage.
After the baby is born, how soon can I have sex?

Whether you give birth vaginally or by C-section, your body will need time to heal. Many health care providers recommend waiting four to six weeks before resuming intercourse. This allows time for your cervix to close and any tears or a repaired episiotomy to heal.

If you're too sore or exhausted to even think about sex, maintain intimacy in other ways. Stay connected during the day with short phone calls, email messages or text messages. Reserve a few quiet minutes for each other before the day begins or while you're winding down before bed. When you're ready to have sex, take it slow — and use a reliable method of contraception if you want to prevent a subsequent pregnancy.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sex-during-pregnancy/HO00140


Pregnancy Tips : How to Have Sex During Pregnancy


Having sex during pregnancy is healthiest during the second trimester and at the end of the third trimester. Have sexual intercourse during pregnancy with tips from a gynecologist and obstetrician in this free video on pregnancy.

Expert: Dr. Jill Hechtman M.D. OB/GYN
Contact: www.ob-gyn.com
Bio: Dr. Jill Hechtman, M.D. is an Ob/Gyn and vice president of Tampa Obstetrics.
Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz





Having sex when you're pregnant

OK, you’ve done it. You’ve made the baby. Sex for the next nine months is officially for fun only. But your ever-changing body may have other ideas, leaving you too sick and exhausted to play. And what about how your partner’s feeling?

‘Our mothers’ generation assumed sex was off the menu throughout pregnancy because there was so little research or knowledge about sex in pregnancy and doctors erred on the side of caution,’ explains sex researcher and psychologist Dr Petra Boynton. ‘Modern women want to stay sexually active while they’re pregnant,’ she continues, ‘and the latest research shows that, for most of us, it’s safe and beneficial.’

When you first discover you’re pregnant there are often mixed emotions for you and your partner: euphoria over the new life you’ve created and worry about how you can keep your baby safe. Plus there’s something very profound about creating new life that can leave you feeling both awe-struck and bewildered.

‘This is like no other time in your life,’ says psychosexual therapist Rachel Foux, author of Masterclass: Pregnant Sex (£14.95, Erotic Review Books). ‘Neither of you will quite know what to expect over the coming months, so it’s important to be aware of any potential issues.’ And being open about your feelings from the start means you can talk through problems as they arise.

First trimester

‘For many women, the first few weeks of being pregnant are an opportunity to get back in touch with your body and be more spontaneous,’ says Petra. ‘The downside is that you might not want to have sex at all.’ If you’re not floored by pregnancy symptoms, many women find they just need a break from the baby making.
‘When I found out I was pregnant I felt closer to my partner than ever, but sex-wise I just wasn’t interested,’ says Alice Williams, 29, a librarian. ‘The raging hormones meant my boobs were really sensitive – I couldn’t even bear clothes touching them, never mind his hands!’

Pregnancy also has massive psychological impact – on him as well as you. ‘Although Janine looked the same, the idea that she had another human being growing inside her was quite shocking,’ says Andy Robertson, 32, an engineer. ‘As well as finding the whole situation weird, I also worried that having sex might be dangerous. I knew it was silly but I couldn’t help thinking I might shake the baby loose. It definitely killed off any lust. Fortunately that was only temporary.’

Men’s knowledge of pregnancy is generally limited, so it’s up to you to reassure him that sex is safe. ‘The only problem most women encounter in the first trimester is feeling nauseous and having to stop halfway through,’ says Rachel. It’s a common problem, so it’s better to warn him.

Any sexual position you like is safe in the first trimester, ‘as long as you don’t get too athletic and aren’t a high-risk pregnancy,’ says Rachel. ‘The missionary can be particularly rewarding now, because it’s romantic and intimate and celebrates the life you’ve created together.’

There are some situations in which sex isn’t recommended. ‘If you have a history of miscarriage, or there’s any bleeding, or you have had IVF, then your pregnancy is a high risk one and your midwife might advise you not to make love throughout these early weeks when risk of miscarriage is higher than in an established pregnancy,’ says Petra. ‘Don’t be shy about asking your doctor or midwife about sex, too,’ she adds. ‘You have the right to a healthy sex life but you have to stay safe, too.’ Make the most of it before your bump comes between you!

Second trimester

If you’re lucky, this is the time when the sickness subsides, your energy levels rise and your sex drive rears its head again. ‘An increase in the hormone oestrogen increases the blood flow to your pelvis and your sexual organs will become much more sensitive than before you got pregnant,’ says Petra. ‘Orgasms can become more intense: many women report their first orgasm, or multiple orgasm, during this phase. Vivid, explicit dreams and fantasies are also common.’ These may or may not star your partner.

However, this is also the trimester in which men are most likely to report feeling confused about sex. ‘It’s hard for him to keep up with the changes going on inside you,’ she says. ‘He might just have got used to the idea that sex is off the menu for a while, and suddenly you’re a crazed ball of lust who won’t give him a moment’s peace.’

What’s more, this is the time you’re likely to start showing. The physical evidence of the changes in your body can make him anxious about sex and even reluctant to make love to you.

‘I was so pleased and, I’ll admit it, proud of myself, when I got Helen pregnant,’ remembers Danny Wood, 41, a graphic designer. ‘As she started showing, she got that glow about her and I fancied her more than ever. But I was afraid to initiate sex. I couldn’t stop thinking about how precious and fragile she was now.’

If your partner goes off sex at this stage, it’s easy to think it’s because you look bigger. But it’s not that he doesn’t still find you attractive. ‘Most men love to see you become voluptuous. It’s more likely that the bump is bringing the reality of impending fatherhood home to him.’ says Petra.

Hurting the baby is a common concern. ‘Your baby is safe in your womb: apart from the barrier of your cervix, the amniotic sac is strong and his penis won’t rupture it.’ He might also be freaking out about what is or isn’t appropriate now you’re going to be someone’s mum. Again, constant communication is the key. ‘Reassure him that you might be carrying his child, but you’re still his lover.’

Any position that avoids weight placed on your abdomen is safe during this trimester. ‘Some women, and most men, love it when he lies back and you straddle him, allowing him to admire your blossoming body. It’s great if you’re feeling powerful and energetic. You on all fours with him behind is great if body confidence is an issue,’ says Rachel.

Third trimester

There’s no getting away from it: during the final trimester of pregnancy you are, frankly, huge. Body-image problems and logistics make this the most challenging trimester for passion.

‘I planned to keep having sex for as long as possible,’ says Debbie Morgan, 35, an estate agent. ‘But at about 30 weeks I suddenly developed stretchmarks all over my stomach, I was retaining water and I had backache. What’s more, I kept feeling the baby kicking me in the ribs. Sex felt a bit creepy.’

And now your baby is more aware of the world outside, is it time to stop? ‘He knows that there’s some kind of activity going on, but he has no concept of sex. It’s certainly not going to scar him psychologically,’ says Petra.

Many women report a surge in desire after the second trimester. ‘If you are in the mood, have as much sex as you like. It could be a while before you have the energy to do it again,’ says Petra. That said, in the last trimester there are some medical circumstances in which you should stick to kissing and cuddling. These include placenta praevia (where the placenta covers, or is close to, the cervix), multiple pregnancy, whenever there’s any sign of bleeding, of if you have a history of premature labour. If you’ve had a show (where the plug of mucus blocking your cervix comes out) or your waters have broken, sex is definitely not a good idea. Both of these are signs that labour will begin in the next few days. ‘Even if you’re a high-risk category and the doctor says no sex, that doesn’t mean no kissing, oral sex or massage,’ says Petra.

And what about using sex to get your labour started? ‘There is some truth to the idea that semen triggers labour although the research shows this is not a risk before term [37 weeks],’ says Rachel. ‘Intercourse – or even giving him oral sex and swallowing – can be one way to induce labour if you’re overdue.

Your size plus late pregnancy complications like symphysis pubis dysfunction (pelvic joint pain) do limit the range of positions you can try at this stage. ‘The spoons position is tender, nurturing, intimate and, above all, easy,’ says Rachel. ‘Lie on your side and let him snuggle up behind you. Penetration is shallow and shouldn’t be too taxing for either of you, plus it appeals to his protective instincts.’


Five great reasons to have sex when you’re pregnant

- Your body is geared up for better, easier sex: increased blood flow to the pelvic area can cause engorgement of the genitals and heighten the sensation.

- Sex increases your bond with your partner. You’re heading for a magical, but stressful, time so the closer you are in the run-up to the birth, the better.

- Orgasm – or just massage – is a great way to relieve tension in the body and soothe aching limbs.

- It helps you prepare for childbirth by keeping your pelvic muscles strong and supple.

- It’s free and it’s fun. What else can you say that about during pregnancy?



http://www.askamum.co.uk/Pregnancy/Search-Results/Sex/Having-sex-when-youre-pregnant/



¿Se desaconseja practicar sexo durante el embarazo?

Sin duda el sexo es muy importante para la pareja durante el periodo de gestación tanto psicólogos como ginecólogos lo recomiendan, con la excepción de que existan problemas físicos en la mujer que le hagan mantener un reposo o seguir un trtamiento especial. Para más información http://www.elembarazo.net








¿Puedo practicar sexo durante el embarazo?


El sexo en el embarazo es más común de lo que se cree. Se tiende a pensar que el apetito sexual de las mujeres en esta etapa disminuye y, hasta cierto punto es real. Durante las primeras semanas de gestación, alrededor del 54% de las mujeres ven que el deseo sexual desaparece por las náuseas y otros síntomas. Pero a esto se suman viejos tabús y otros miedos que nos hacen creer que el sexo durante esta etapa es perjudicial. Realmente, este deseo depende del trimestre, pero también de cada mamá. Además, ni la mamá ni el bebé corren riesgos. De hecho, puede ser beneficioso para ambos. Excepto en el caso de un embarazo de riesgo o cuando el médico contraindique las relaciones vaginales, debes disfrutar del sexo.

En el primer trimestre, algunas mujeres no quieren hacer el amor por los malestares habituales de esta etapa. En cambio, otras tienen más deseos sexuales, especialmente por los cambios en la sensibilidad genital que provocan los cambios hormonales.

Con el cuarto mes de gestación, a partir de la semana 14, el cuerpo ya se ha habituado y, cargado de hormonas, multiplica la libido de la mujer. Desde entonces y hasta el sexto o séptimo mes, la mujer puede tener la actividad sexual que quiera. Incluso las hay que pueden excitarse con más facilidad y rapidez. Aumenta la hinchazón de los labios mayores y menores y también la lubricidad de la vagina, por lo cual, el acto sexual puede llegar a ser más placentero, alcanzando en ocasiones el multiorgasmo.

Del sexto mes en adelante, con la semana 24, algunas parejas practican menos sexo porque incomodidad o por preocupación. Pero la mayoría continúan con su vida sexual normal. En los últimos meses, el orgasmo resulta más beneficioso que nunca para la premamá y su futuro hijo.

Beneficios

Una buena sexualidad durante el embarazo prepara el cuerpo para un parto vaginal, los músculos de la vagina se ejercitan durante una relación sexual y mejoran su tono muscular para el momento del nacimiento. Además, con el ejercicio, el bebé recibe más oxígeno, lo cual le ayuda a estar más sano.

Tu hijo no notatá nada, excepto tu palpitación más rápida y tu respiración acelerada. A menos que tu embrazo sea complicado, no debes preocuparte por el pequeño. La membranas ovulares y el líquido amniótico le protejen y además, el cuello del útero está cerrado con un moco protector hasta que rompes aguas.

Embarazos de riesgo

Si tu embarazo está considerado de alto riesgo o surgen situaciones especiales que podrían complicar tu situación, el médico te sugerirá espaciar o abandonar las relaciones sexuales. Es recomendable dejar las en los siguientes casos:

* Si hay antecedentes de aborto sin causa
* Si tienes menos de 36 semanas de embarazo y existen riesgos de parto prematuro
* Por hemorragias vaginales sin explicación
* Si existe placenta previa o inserción baja de la placenta. Esto ocurre cuando la placenta se sitúa en la parte inferior cubriendo de forma parcial o total el cuello uterino y hace imposible el parto vaginal
* Si tienes dolor intenso y calambre abdominal anormal y el médico considera que no es por un síntoma normal del embarazo
* Por incompetencia ístmico-cervical, hasta el mes posterior de su tratamiento quirúrgico. La incompetencia ístmico-cervical se caracteriza porque el cuello uterino es insuficiente para llevar al bebé hasta el final del embarazo. Puede ser congénita o adquirida por parto con fórceps, dilatación quirúrgica…
* Cuando hay dilatación del cuello uterino o rotura de aguas precoz, porque pueden facilitar el ingreso de gérmenes en la cavidad amniótica,
* Durante tratamientos por herpes vaginal u otras infecciones
* A partir del último trimestre de un embarazo múltiple

http://semanas.elembarazo.net/sexo-durante-el-embarazo.html










Posturas sexuales durante el embarazo


El coito es la práctica sexual más generalizada, y aunque parezca mentira a estas alturas de la película, dentro de éste la postura del misionero sigue dominando por encima de cualquier otra (de hecho muchas personas la consideran algo así como la "postura normal"). Pero, ¿qué pasa cuando por ejemplo durante el embarazo, esta postura no puede practicarse por el volumen abdominal de la mujer? Pues de hecho, nada más y nada menos que buscar e innovar nuestro repertorio erótico y sexual.

Hemos de recordar -y es un buen momento para ello- que la sexualidad es algo más que un conjunto de posturas atléticas. Por ello, si durante esta época te olvidas del coito, tampoco va a pasar nada grave; quizás incluso te puedas llegar a divertir mucho más. Aunque lo realmente importante es que los dos os sintáis cómodos y relajados a la hora de buscar alternativas.



Pero si lo tuyo es la práctica coital, ahí van unas cuántas propuestas:

- Mujer en posición supina (encima de la pareja)

Esta posición permite que tú controles la profundidad de la penetración y el ritmo de los movimientos coitales, lo cual en ocasiones te puede hacer sentir más segura; aunque como tú eres la que manda en esta posición, también puede ser que te fatigues más que en otras posiciones.

Debes sentarte, lo más cómodamente que puedas, encima de tu pareja, e incluso puedes pedirle que sus rodillas actúen de respaldo.

Mujer y hombre en posición lateral

Estas posiciones son las que más frecuentemente se utilizan durante todo el embarazo. Son menos cansadas, nos permiten un mayor contacto de los cuerpos, y nos dejan las manos libres para poder estimular y acariciar todo el cuerpo. ¡Atrévete a probarlo!

Puedes tener diferentes variantes:

- Los dos estáis de lado, aunque tu espalda está apoyada en el pecho de tu pareja. La penetración se da por vía vaginal, pero iniciando la penetración por detrás. Encogiendo o levantando la pierna te será más fácil.

- Tú puedes descansar todo tu cuerpo sobre la cama, y él lateralmente puede hacer la penetración. Tus caderas, y las piernas (rodillas) serán las piezas claves en esta posición, ya que deberás elevarlas o inclinarlas hacia tu pareja.

- Puedes estar apoyada, lateralmente, sobre tu propio brazo, y él en posición, también lateral, podrá sujetar tu pierna, para que la penetración sea relajada.

Mujer sentada, o apoyada en la cama

Tanto en la cama como en una silla puedes sentarte a horcajadas sobre tu pareja.

- Si lo haces en una silla, puedes variar a medida que vaya avanzando el embarazo ya que el volumen de tu abdomen será mayor. Puedes sentarte mirándolo de frente, o también dándole la espalda.

- Si te reclinas sobre un extremo de vuestra cama, él puede arrodillarse frente a ti para poder practicar el coito.


http://www.parasaber.com/salud/sexualidad/practicas-sexuales/posturas-sexuales/articulo/embarazo-sexualidad-sexo-posturas-sexuales-durante/12001/







Posturas sexuales recomendables durante el embarazo

Durante el embarazo, pueden practicarse relaciones sexuales, siempre teniendo en cuenta que existen determinadas posturas que están más indicadas en esta etapa. La psicóloga Mª José Miguel Quilis (de Apai) explica cuáles son. Si quieres saber más, entra en www.elembarazo.net







El Mama Sutra

Estas son algunas de las posturas eróticas más recomendables para practicar durante el embarazo:

De lado: es una posición muy cómoda si el “bombo” está muy desarrollado. La mujer se tumba de lado y el hombre detrás de ella, sujetando con el torso parte de su peso. Él la penetra desde atrás levantándole, si es necesario, una pierna con la mano para facilitar el acto. Así no hay presión sobre el abdomen de la mujer y, además, él puede acariciarle los pechos o la tripa.

Cara a cara: la mujer se coloca encima del hombre, en posición supina y así es capaz de controlar el ritmo y la profundidad de la penetración. Aunque parezca una postura cansada para una embarazada de más de cinco o seis meses, no lo es tanto: el hombre puede usar sus muslos y rodillas de respaldo para que la mujer esté cómoda y se concentre plenamente en los movimientos vaginales.

Boca arriba: la embarazada se tumba boca arriba y el hombre la penetra de lado, colocándose bajo las piernas de ella. Es una postura reservada a embarazadas de cuatro meses o menos, ya que a partir del quinto mes el peso del útero podría oprimir vasos sanguíneos de gran importancia.

Sentados: una silla puede ser muy útil a la hora de sujetar el peso de ambos cuerpos y aportar comodidad al acto sexual. Por supuesto, el hombre se sienta abajo y ella sobre él, con las piernas abiertas, se introduce el pene. Si el embarazo está muy avanzado, la mujer puede sentarse de espaldas.

Cuatro patas: los adictos a esta postura pueden practicarla durante los dos primeros trimestres de embarazo, teniendo cuidado en colocar unos almohadones bajo el vientre de ella, para que no se vea obligada a hacer tanto esfuerzo.


http://www.adn.es/sexo/20080324/NWS-0096-Embarazadas-accion.html




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INFO

- http://semanas.elembarazo.net/sexo-durante-el-embarazo.html

- http://www.parasaber.com/salud/sexualidad/practicas-sexuales/posturas-sexuales/articulo/embarazo-sexualidad-sexo-posturas-sexuales-durante/12001/

- http://www.adn.es/sexo/20080324/NWS-0096-Embarazadas-accion.html

- http://www.abcdelbebe.com/node/39203

- http://pregnancy.about.com/cs/sexuality/a/pregsex_2.htm

- http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sex-during-pregnancy/HO00140

- http://www.askamum.co.uk/Pregnancy/Left-hand-nav/Sex/

- http://thestir.cafemom.com/pregnancy/108637/pregnancy_fetish_when_men_find

- http://www.askamum.co.uk/Pregnancy/Search-Results/Sex/Having-sex-when-youre-pregnant/